Mississippi Burning (1988)

Mississippi Burning (1988) Trailer

<http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rmAqrMtB-Qg>

Before I write my feelings/thoughts about this film, let’s review some facts of the past (history):

The African-American Civil Rights Movement

Well, we all know that back in the days the Blacks were looked down upon by the Whites as third class citizens (even though they, too, are American citizens) and hence were maltreated. They had no voting rights and there was race segregation. The “Coloured ones” are not allowed to share the same privileges as the “White ones”.

And here comes an extremist group…the infamous Klu Klux Klan.

Ku Klux Klan – a group of extremists who believe in white supremacy, to the extent of showing no mercy to the other inferior races.

I… don’t.. get… it…

I am astounded by how blinded people can be to kill and torture other fellow human beings in such an extreme way…blinded by their own pride… their perception of superiority…

For more information about the KKK, you can visit:

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Mississippi Burning (1988) is based on a real-life event where three civil rights workers (Michael Schwerner, Andrew Goodman, James Chaney) were murdered in the U.S. state of Mississippi in 1964. To be fair, the movie did dramatise this particular event (as a blockbuster movie would), however this does not mean that it was “not as bad as it seems”.

The film revolves around two FBI agents, Agent ward (the younger one and one in charge) and Agent Anderson (the not so young one) who were in charge of solving the case of the three “Missing Boys”. Agent Ward is rigid and acts according to the rule book. On the other hand, Agent Anderson, who was a former Mississippi sheriff, does things indirectly…

Agent Anderson & Agent Ward

I am actually impressed at how Agent Anderson started a conversation, especially when no one was willing to talk. Like how he used flowers to start a conversation! I was like, “wow! That’s smart!”. I guess I should learn a thing or two from this as I find difficulties ‘breaking the ice’ with strangers.

And now… my response to the event depicted in the film…

I was furious at how anyone could be so cruel to those who did you no harm (except not wearing the same skin colour)

I was frustrated at the fact that bystanders just stood watching! (though I can understand why) What was most frustrating was when those in authority, who can actually do something about it, just stood and WATCH!

This was one tough movie… I wanted to just jump into the screen and strangle their necks (but of course I can never do that). But it does make me wonder whether I would do anything if I was one of the neighbours…not a person in authority. After being witness to what happened to those who defy the “authorities”, would I still stand up for what is right? I suppose I’ll only know when I am placed in that kind of situation…

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For those who are interested, I happen to stumble upon a documentary (52 minutes) which revealed the true story of Mississippi Burning.

The True Story of Mississippi Burning

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VGEnLapo-4A

The ACTUAL civil rights workers who were murdered

From Left: Michael Schwerner, James Chaney, Andrew Goodman

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To the man who fought for the rights of the African Americans – Martin Luther King Jr.

Below is a link with his well-known speech… and all I can say is, his dream came true.

 Martin Luther King Jr.– I Have A Dream Speech – August 28, 1963

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=smEqnnklfYs

For more information about him, visit:

http://www.nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/peace/laureates/1964/king-bio.html

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